Stalker, Zona, Roadside Picnic, and down the Tarkovsky wormhole

Tarkovsky on the set of Stalker
Tarkovsky on the set of Stalker

Since discovering Stalker in early 2012, I've taken a much deeper dive into the world of Andrei Tarkovsky, and have now seen 6 of his 7 films. If you enjoy exploring abandoned places, and are open to taking a meditative look into what it all means, then Stalker is essential viewing.

In the near future, an unseen alien force has taken possession of an area of Russian wilderness that authorities have dubbed The Zone. The only thing known for sure about the region is that few who enter it ever return. Led by a Stalker, one of a small group of outlaws able to safely navigate the Zone, a renegade scientist and a cynical, burnt-out writer penetrate the dangers outside in search of the power and transcendence rumored to exist inside. The Stalker longs to un-do a mysterious physical transformation the Zone has performed on his young daughter. The scientist will risk anything to see that reason triumphs over faith. The writer seeks a germ of inspiration that the crumbling and corrupt world beyond the Zone no longer provides.
Together, these three men become desperate pilgrims walking a desolate trail leading to one of the most enigmatic and tantalizing endings in the history of cinema. A haunting and honest meditation on the intersection of science, feeling, and faith, Stalker is both profoundly unsettling and deeply moving. - Kino Video

Stalker becomes more rewarding with multiple viewings. Tarkovsky is a master of the long take, and many of his films are light on traditional narrative. This isn't easy viewing. That's OK. Like a lot of great art, the viewer needs to do a little bit of work to get the most out of the experience. The four books and two documentaries below will help you explore the world of Tarkovsky:

Geoff Dyer's Zona is theoretically about Stalker, but it's also about how our relationship with art changes over time. Wonderful, light hearted ramblings on a difficult, heavy film.

Roadside Picnic - Stalker is based on the Russian science fiction novel Roadside Picnic. Beyond being a big fan of Philip K. Dick, I don't usually read a lot of sci-fi. Roadside Picnic was a fast, fun read. Reading the book before seeing Stalker won't ruin the movie for you. Tarkovsky's film jettisons the narrative in favor of spiritual and philosophical explorations.

 

The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky: A Visual Fugue - After watching Stalker, I watched Solaris again, and then saw Andrei Rublev, Mirror, Nostalghia, and The Sacrifice. Johnson and Petrie's book was a really helpful guide to understanding Tarkovsky's history, themes, influences, cultural context, working methods, and critical reception. I was initially concerned that this book might be too academic, but it's got an easy to read style, and is very insightful.

Sculpting in Time - I haven't finished Tarkovsky's essays on filmmaking yet. I'm taking this book a little bit at a time, but it's certainly essential reading for understanding Tarkovsky's universe.

 

One Day in the Life of Andrei Arsenevich - Chris Marker's (La Jetée) documentary has a mix of clips from all 7 films, Tarkovsky directing, and Tarkovsky re-united with his family during his final illness. Recommended.

Voyage in Time - If you're going down the rabbit hole (or perhaps wormhole), the documentary Voyage in Time follows an exiled Tarkovsky scouting locations in Italy with Antonioni's screenwriter Tonino Guerra. This one is slow going, and for the completist only. Probably works best if you've seen Nostalghia.

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