Night photography: Lightning over abandoned mining ruins

Reuben's House -- by Troy Paiva
Reuben's House -- by Troy Paiva

During a full moon road trip last month, Troy Paiva and I got caught in an intense storm while shooting at the mining ruins of Kincaid, Nevada. As the lightning got closer we pointed our cameras in the direction of the strikes, and Troy made the fantastic image above. A composite of multiple 4 minute exposures in order to blend the best take of the flashlight painting on the house with the lightning strike in the sky.

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New Topographics: Show review and selected books

Lewis Baltz -- North Wall, Semicoa, 333 McCormick, Costa Mesa 1974
Lewis Baltz -- North Wall, Semicoa, 333 McCormick, Costa Mesa 1974

New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape opened yesterday at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) and runs through October 3, 2010 along with the companion exhibit, Picturing Modernity. I visited the museum yesterday, and really enjoyed the show. I've spent quite a bit of time with the superb New Topographics book -- viewing the actual prints was exciting.

Most of the exhibition contains small silver gelatin black and white prints with an open, low/medium contrast style of printing that is befitting of the subject matter. A few of the Lewis Baltz prints are a notable exception, with very deep blacks and stark high contrast printing. Stephen Shore's photos are the only color images in the show.

Seeing the Joe Deal aerial subdivision views all together on the wall gave them a lot more weight than in the book. There is so much tension in not having any sky or horizon line. My eye wants to see something in the image as the horizon, which gives an off-kilter feeling to some of the images.

Finding a photographic approach that deferred and complexified meaning rather than specifying it, is what made these pictures interesting to me. -- John Schott

John Schott's work was also better on the wall than in the book. His accompanying audio segment is especially poignant. I'm still puzzling out how Nicholas Nixon's Boston rooftop images fit into the show - they're dense with the detail of the city skyline. Gohlke's irrigation canal image is a deceivingly simple image that reflects the man vs. nature theme of the show so well with the beautiful sky and reflection balanced by weeds and tire tracks in the mud.

After seeing large prints of the Becher's Industrial Landscapes a few years ago, the smaller prints in this show seemed lackluster, and a few are in need of conservation. This re-staging of the 1975 exhibit really shows the modest scale of the prints in the current era of giant 10 foot prints that are trying to compete with painting. After spending a considerable amount of time contemplating these intimate black and white prints, the large scale of the work in the Fisher Collection seemed rather ostentatious at times. Perhaps you'll want to save that exhibition for another day.

Tip: Pick up the free audio tour to the left of the staircase as you walk into the museum. The New Topographics exhibit features about 2 minutes of commentary from most of the photographers.

Books from the Photographers in New Topographics

The New Topographics book is outstanding. Published by Steidl this year, the title seems to regularly go in and out of stock with each press run. I recommend reading the essays before seeing the show. The reproduction of the original catalog in the book is very cool. Below is a selected book list of photographers in the show, some with brief commentary. If there are photographers in the show that you'd like to investigate further, hopefully this list will save you some time.

Robert Adams

Lewis Baltz

Bernd and Hilla Becher

Joe Deal

Frank Golhke

Nicholas Nixon

John Schott

  • No monographs other than inclusion in the New Topographics book.

Stephen Shore

Henry Wessel

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Night photography: Interview with Troy Paiva, night photographer

lensflare35 interview with Troy Paiva Lensflare35 features an extensive audio interview with night photographer Troy Paiva. Troy talks about his influences, light painting, urban exploration, and explains the lighting in a slideshow full of images.

Over the weekend, Blake Andrews posted an interview with Troy Paiva and me about night photography, ruin porn, and urban exploration.

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Film vs. Digital Night Photography: Interview with Troy Paiva of Lost America

Recently I had the opportunity to view some amazing long exposure film images by my friend and fellow night photography workshop instructor Troy Paiva. The film images are 45 minute exposures at f/11 using Kodak E100VS film in a 35mm camera. I noted that Troy made both film and digital exposures from a similar vantage point for a few of these images, and asked if I could show some comparisons -- he graciously agreed. Below are 3 sets of images with my thoughts on the look and relative strengths of each format, followed by commentary from Troy. I look forward to hearing your comments on how the film and digital versions compare!

Film vs. Digital Night Photography Set #1 -- Business Coupe

Business Coupe 45 -- by Troy Paiva
Business Coupe 45 -- by Troy Paiva
Business Coupe 2 -- by Troy Paiva
Business Coupe 2 -- by Troy Paiva

Joe: The long lines of the car are really accentuated by the huge star trails in the film version. The slightly lower and closer camera position, and light falloff on the back of the car really create dimensionality. I love the texture on the side of the car, the brightly lit rear wheel, and headliner details in the film version. Looks like the front part of the car had some fill light?

The digital version has the fantastic color blending, which is really set off by the subtle purples and oranges in the sky. The short star trails work extremely well in this case because the Big Dipper is so identifiable. The hard angle used for the green light painting really brings out the shape and texture in the car, and the positioning of the windows against the line of the mountains adds wonderful complexity to the middle of the composition. The shadows in the digital version seem more open, and the digital version feels much cleaner overall. Tell me about your strategy for the lighting in the digital version. Also, what was the color temperature to get the sky that color? Both images are very successful, but I'm partial to the film version.

Troy: The film image is lit by a natural xenon Stinger Streamlight from off camera-right, the same basic angle that I did the green flashlight in the digital version.  I was looking to pull out the form in the front fender and how it transitions into the body of the car.  The white balance on the digital image is 7500º, quite hot, but I wanted that warm sunset-y purple sky to compliment the predominant greens of the lighting.

These were shot right after sunset on the day after the full moon, when the moon-rise happened about an hour after sunset.  The digital image was done first and has no moonlight in it and just a slight touch of daylight (seen lighting the distant vehicles), so I knew that to get any light here, I would have to add it myself.   I light painted the hell out of it, from several angles, so none of the car's form would be lost in silhouette.  The film version was set up next and was also started before the moonrise.  Over the course of the 45 minute exposure, however, the moon rose, but the angle of moonlight is still extremely low, creating long shadows and interesting highlights.

I like the digital version better, personally.  I think the color and sharpness rule the day.  I also like the '70s Dodge Dart popping into the frame on the right, it balances the composition.  This is a copy of a similar set up done by one of our students, Tim Little, during the workshop, the night before.  When I happened upon him shooting this, I knew I wanted to do my own take on it.

Film vs. Digital Night Photography Set #2 -- 1972 Ford Galaxie 500

Freebie -- by Troy Paiva
Freebie -- by Troy Paiva
The Bean -- by Troy Paiva
The Bean -- by Troy Paiva

Joe: Unlike the first comparison, the compositions here are radically different. With a 45 minute exposure, you want a lot of sky. The film shot is more a "vehicle in context," and the digital version is tight and textural. The digital version really sings for me in this set -- the juxtaposition of the dense lines on the front grill against the moving plant is superb. The lighting on the grill and under the hood have a lot of texture and snap. Tell me about you lighting strategy for this image, and also the color palette choice -- which is hugely important to making this image work so well.

Troy: When doing these extremely long film exposures I want a lot of star movement, so I tend to frame with a lot of sky to help make it the dominant subject.  The digital image is more about the car and creosote, and my lighting treatment on them, so I tightened up on those.

The film image has a little xenon flashlight on on the grille from camera-left.  The digital has lime-gelled LED light from the same location, but I also hit the underside of the hood and just got more light on the car in general.  I also used a green-gelled and snooted light on the headlights.  Is the green too similar to the lime?  Perhaps, but I really wanted the headlights to only be slightly different and not pop too much because I wanted the other areas like the hood and plant to not be lost while people are oogling the headlights.  It's a fine line.  I also lit the driver-side fender with a natural LED flashlight to pull out some shadow details on that side of the car in an effort to give that deep shadow area some detail and give some pop to the creosote bush.Like you, I think the digital image is far more interesting and absorbing.  Truth be told, I wanted that much light on the film version too, but I simply didn't hit it enough. Light painting on film is extremely difficult because you can't preview the image to make sure you got what you need.  The digital version took 3 tries before I was happy enough with it to move on to something else.  Because of this, I keep my film light painting to a minimum.

Film vs. Digital Night Photography Set #3 -- Southbound Winnie

Southbound Winnie 45 -- by Troy Paiva
Southbound Winnie 45 -- by Troy Paiva
Southbound Winnie 2 -- by Troy Paiva
Southbound Winnie 2 -- by Troy Paiva

Joe: The film Winnebago image has the classic circular star trails achieved by pointing the camera towards Polaris (the North Star). Film is great for this classic compositional technique because you don't have to worry about battery life or noise reduction. The color palette of the E100VS really works the deep dark cyans of the sky against the warm yellows of the desert sand. The film version has a lot of snap. The digital version has a quieter, more clean and subtle look in this set. The interior is lit with just enough light to add color and texture, and the headlight painting gives the front grill some personality. Can you talk about how much light was used on the interior. I'm also interested in any thoughts on compositional strategies with digital when composing in a northward direction?

Troy: I did the digital shot first here and saw that the North Star was lined up on the center of the vehicle, so I knew that it was a good candidate for a killer star spiral on a long film exposure.  I was really drawn to the blocky, chiseled symmetrical look of the RV here, so I composed to accentuate that.  I love that you can see the lights of Ridgecrest reflected in the windshield too.

In both cases, the interior  is lit with a red LED flashlight from both sides, basically doing my best to make sure the interior got filled with light.  The volume of light is much less on the film version.  Some of that is from the aperture of the film version being f11 (vs. f5.6 for the digital), but I just don't think I put as much light in there.  It is, unfortunately, a very inexact science.  Both images also have snooted LED light on the headlights as well.  Note also that I burned down the chunk of white insulation in the lower left corner on the digital version, but left it on the film.  It was terribly distracting.

I'm partial to the digital version here too.  It's just smoother and cleaner and the lighting pops more.  Yeah, I know, I've chosen the digital versions unanimously.  What can I say?  When I moved to digital in 2005 I said I'd never shoot film at night again and it took me 4 years to decide to tinker with it again.  I really wanted to see how I'd react to it.  While there's nothing that can compare with these crazy-long star trails and that surreal softness to the shadows and overall quality of light, I just think the excessive contrast and grain, a byproduct of reciprocity failure in film exposures this length, renders the images less clear and tight.  Someday (soon) you're going to be able to do 45 minute long digital exposures, retaining the best traits of both mediums.  I'm looking forward to that.

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Night Photography: Night Writerz Podcast Interview with Joe Reifer

White Tractor -- by Joe Reifer
White Tractor -- by Joe Reifer

The latest episode of the Night Writerz podcast features an interview with yours truly. Open up iTunes on your Mac or PC, search for the Night Writerz, and subscribe! Here's direct link to episode #7 of this great podcast dedicated to night photography. The episode starts with a slideshow of night photography -- make sure iTunes is setup to see the images at bottom left.

The interview starts at 5 minutes into the episode, and covers a wide range of night photography topics including exposure considerations, light painting, workshops, and the San Francisco Bay Area night photography community. Many thanks to Chad Clark of the Night Writerz for having me on the show! And check out the past episodes, including interviews with Troy Paiva, Chris Conrad, and Dave Black.

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Now Playing: Guest of Cindy Sherman

Just heard from Stephen at the amazing Oddball Film & Video that the film Guest of Cindy Sherman is now screening in San Francisco at the Roxie Theater in the Mission District [Map]. Here's an interview with filmmaker Paul H-O on salon.com, and a write up from Oddball's private screening last Fall. If you live in the Bay Area, Oddball's email list is highly recommended.

Here are a few quotes from the film:

“Overall the art world is bullshit.” - Eric Bogosian “It’s one blow job after another.”- David Ross, Whitney Museum of Art

"I like the elitism of the art world. I think art for the people is a terrible idea." - John Waters

Update: I saw the film and it's thought provoking and recommended. The funny thing is that Cindy Sherman seems like the nicest most down to earth person, and filmmaker Paul H-O seems like a whiney complainer. According to this 2008 interview with Paul H-O, Cindy Sherman had quite a bit of control over what got shown in the final film and what didn't. A little bit of further research yielded a great article on The American Prospect called Portrait of Misogyny that has some very interesting commentary about art world bubbles and gender roles. Guest of Cindy Sherman runs through Thursday at the Roxie.

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Five Decades of Bill Owens

Bill Owens: 5 Decades of PhotographyPhoto Central Gallery, April 17-June 18, 2009 1099 E Street, Hayward, CA [Google Map] photocentral.org

Bill Owens is an internationally renowned photographer living in Hayward. His most famous work, Suburbia, has been exhibited in museums around the globe but it is just one part of his dynamic creative life. This exhibition is the first to feature Bill’s photographs from the Peace Corps in the sixties to the Rolling Stones at Altamont all the way to his newest video work. Bill is a vibrant “people person” who shows us our real selves with wry humor and wit. If you only see one exhibition this year-this should be the one! Learn more about Bill at: billowens.com

Important Note: Medium-sized prints are very reasonably priced at $300-500 unframed. For those on a budget there are signed Suburbia posters for $10, T-shirts for $20, and small prints for $150. The show also includes a folio of 10 prints for $900 that includes 8 silver prints and 2 color.

Bill Owens Books

Many people know Bill's classic book Suburbia, but his other 1970's books are underrated gems, especially Working (I do it for the money), and Our Kind of People: American Groups and Rituals. These two books are highly recommended, and usually available used for $10-15. Leisure is quite good, with a sprinkling of newer work. I haven't looked at last year's hardcover monograph entitled Bill Owens. In addition to photography, Bill is a microbrewery and craft distilling pioneer, heads up the American Distilling Institute, and has a forthcoming book on making whiskey.

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